Flying Circus – Motivated Artists

The video above was made for a 72 hour International Film Festival. This circus story goes behind the scenes with the artists of a flying circus (a flying exhibition team) to ask circus performers what their biggest fears are. There are several different types of flying circuses emphasizing different aspects of the art. There are the “showy styles”, and the more self-expressive, story-telling circus styles. So, are the aerialist afraid of flying in the air, way above the ground? What keeps them focused? For all circus heroes aerial artists, barophobia must be overcome.

This circus story is about these heroes flying high during their performance.

Flying circus artists have words to live by

Aislinn Mulligan’s definition of fear is “All things you haven’t done yet. Not dying would be good.” “There are things that are dangerous but that’s how I like to live my life.” “I like to do things that push me, challenge me, that scares me.” “So I don’t really experience fear as a negative thing, I experience it as a positive, thrilling thing.

But, for Alisabeth Gifford it is quite a different circus story. She is afraid frequently. She relays that she knows that it isn’t a good thing for a circus aerialist to say. Alisabeth is afraid when she makes a mistake on the trapeze. Therefore, she doesn’t know exactly where she will be caught. As a result, she learns to trust her teammates. To her though, her artform represents a quality of life. Her specific expertise is in telling a story and by using her strength and body to tell it.

Makeup is a big part of the show for these everyday heroes. It helps tell the circus story.

Another trapeze artist, Sarah Scanlon’s, definition of fear is of the “committee that sits on your shoulders and tells you that you can’t do something and you tell that voice to be quiet and do some push-ups!!!!.” All of the aerialists do not seem to feel they have limits so they push themselves and feel it is part of the fun.

Each Circus Hero must keep their fear of heights in check.

Flying circus artists don’t let fear stand in their way

Some worry about breaking bones. On the other hand, another has an internal mechanism, a switch that turns on at certain heights and says you can do it. For Sarah Swanson fear is real. She admits that she is actually afraid of heights.

When they are high up in the air practicing trapeze art they must focus on what they are doing. Certainly, they can not think of anything else because their life depends on it. Above all, these everyday heroes message is to follow your dream. To sum up, not give up or let fear stand in your way.

The training facility performers use to keep these everyday heroes in great shape.
Acrobat training is a huge part of making a successful flying circus

What is barophobia?

Barophobia is the irrational fear of gravity. Individuals suffering from barophobia can either have the fear that gravity might crush them, in the same vein, the fear of falling because of the gravity involved (distinct from the fear of heights), or even the fear that gravity might cease to exist and they will float away.

The fear of gravity. Further, this phobia can take two forms. It can be the fear of being crushed by the sheer weight of gravity, or just the opposite, falling off the face of the Earth if gravity were to ever stop existing.

In short, over 19 million people or about 9% of the population have a specific phobia. Teenagers and women are more likely to have specific phobias than adult men. To sum up, trapeze artists are able to overcome this fear.

Video Production: Rocko Productions
Review Written By: M. Cardinal
Date Written: Mar 24th, 2020

Flying Circus FAQs

What is a flying circus?

an organized group of acrobats or trapeze artists engaged in public exhibition flying.

What is the most dangerous circus act?

Acrobats
Knife Thrower.
Lion Tamer.
Human Cannonball.
Flying Trapeze.
Tightrope Walker.

Do flying circus performers get paid?

Entry-level jobs in the circus might pay around $300 a week, while featured performers like acrobats, contortionists or trapeze artists can make between $40,000 to $70,000 a year. You also get free room and board while you’re traveling with the show, which is an added perk.

What is the main attraction in a flying circus?

The trapeze artists are usually the focal point of each flying circus.

In addition, Look for more videos with our artistic heroes:

Intro to everyday heroes – Meet the heroes

Recycled Art – A beautiful new life

Mural Art – The walls speak of hope

Good Picture – Worth a thousand words

Bright future – Art for inspiring minds

Prisoner of War – Hope inspired artwork

Loss of a Child – A tribute as art

More Art

Recycled Art – A Beautiful New Life
Prisoner of War – Hope Inspired Artwork